Four key practices for a more effective philanthropic sector


By Larry Kramer, President, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation


The past two years have changed the terrain on which philanthropy works, not least by bringing overdue recognition to persistent racial, gender, and wealth disparities. This, in turn, has served as a call to action for philanthropy and international development institutions to examine how our own practices have contributed to creating or perpetuating inequity. More importantly, it is a call to do something about it.

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Banani, Mali - December, 30, 2014: Local people work in the countryside near Banani village

Africa’s COP: Where does West Africa stand with respect to the global climate agenda?


By Brilé Anderson, OECD Sahel and West Africa Club Secretariat


The year’s COP27 is being called ‘Africa’s COP’. Even though African countries bear little responsibility for global emissions, they bear some of the harshest impacts. But far from being passive observers, they are active participants in the global climate agenda.

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Quality infrastructure for development concept

Why do we need to invest in quality infrastructure?


By Koki Hirota, Professor, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Saitama University and Visiting Fellow, JICA Ogata Sadako Research Institute for Peace and Development


According to the principles adopted by the G20, quality infrastructure investment consists of six key components: maximising sustainable growth, economic efficiency throughout the life cycle, environmental considerations, resilience, social considerations and governance.

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De nouvelles perspectives énergétiques pour l’Afrique


Par Arnaud Rouget, Directeur du programme Afrique de l’Agence Internationale de l’Énergie


La pandémie a eu de lourdes conséquences sur le développement énergétique de l’Afrique. Alors que, depuis 2013, le nombre de personnes ayant accès à l’électricité augmentait – mettant ainsi le continent sur la bonne voie pour atteindre l’objectif de développement durable n°7 (« Énergie propre et d’un coût abordable ») d’ici 2030 – ce progrès s’est inversé pour la première fois en 2020. Ainsi, aujourd’hui, 600 millions d’Africains vivent sans accès à l’électricité.

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Why Multilateral Development Banks Must Step Up on Debt Relief


By Rishikesh Ram Bhandary, PhD, Assistant Director of the Global Economic Governance Initiative at the Boston University Global Development Policy Center and Sara Jane Ahmed is the founder of the Financial Futures Center and Finance Advisor to the V20 Group of Finance Ministers


With a third of Pakistan under water, millions displaced and commodities like cotton at the heart of Pakistan’s economy destroyed, the existential impact of climate change on vulnerable economies could not be clearer.

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How can we improve development co-operation in fragile contexts?


By Jessica Voorhees, Digital Communications Officer, OECD


We live in an age of crises. Some places are better able to manage and absorb these shocks than others: countries and territories that are exposed to economic, environmental, political and societal risks, but lack the capacity to cope with them, are considered “fragile” by the OECD. This article explores how development actors can support these populations in addressing not only the impact of crises but also the root causes of fragility.

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Inspecting the Final Product in Zambia, Africa

It’s time to put productive capacities at the heart of every development strategy


By Paul Akiwumi, Director, Division for Africa, Least Developed Countries and Special Programme, UNCTAD and Ratnakar Adhikari, Executive Director, Enhanced Integrated Framework


Over the past two decades, the 46 least developed countries (LDCs) have recorded relatively robust economic growth, averaging an annual rate of 5.7% from 2001 to 2019. However, this growth has not necessarily translated into improved development outcomes:  many LDCs are still plagued by poverty, food insecurity and inequality.

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How women stabilise and grow economies in Africa


By Anzetse Were, Senior Economist at FSD Kenya


Women’s contributions to economic output and baseline economic welfare tend to be underestimated due the double injustice of unpaid care work and unpaid work. This double injustice denies women of the compensation, reward, recognition and upward income mobility that come with performing economic tasks – even when the output of those tasks is counted in official calculations. Most often, unpaid care work is neither formally counted as economic output, nor is it compensated. Instead, it is seen as women’s responsibility, due to their gender. This ultimately means that the immense amount of time, effort and skill women (and girls) put into the economy is invisible.

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Tackling data scarcity in developing countries through public-private partnerships


By Mustafizur Rahman, Distinguished Fellow at the Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD), Bangladesh


In 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) called for a data revolution. Five years on, data scarcity became a major concern during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores if public-private partnerships can be an effective means of addressing data gaps in developing countries and helping them to build back better.  

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School children in Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Five ways to build resilience in Nigeria’s education system


By Adedeji Adeniran, Director of Research at the Centre for the Study of the Economies of Africa (CSEA) and Thelma Obiakor, PhD Candidate at the London School of Economics and Political Science


COVID-19 has compounded a long-standing learning crisis in many African countries, where millions of children were already out of school before the pandemic.

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