Woman carrying water, Uganda

How to close the gender care gap in Sub Saharan Africa


By Madina M. Guloba, Development Economist and Senior Research Fellow at the Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) in Kampala, Uganda


Due to gender bias and the patriarchal nature of many African economies, care work, especially unpaid, is considered a woman’s prerogative. This is often intertwined with negative social and cultural norms. In this context, is paternity leave a realistic solution to closing the gender care gap?

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Four key practices for a more effective philanthropic sector


By Larry Kramer, President, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation


The past two years have changed the terrain on which philanthropy works, not least by bringing overdue recognition to persistent racial, gender, and wealth disparities. This, in turn, has served as a call to action for philanthropy and international development institutions to examine how our own practices have contributed to creating or perpetuating inequity. More importantly, it is a call to do something about it.

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How women stabilise and grow economies in Africa


By Anzetse Were, Senior Economist at FSD Kenya


Women’s contributions to economic output and baseline economic welfare tend to be underestimated due the double injustice of unpaid care work and unpaid work. This double injustice denies women of the compensation, reward, recognition and upward income mobility that come with performing economic tasks – even when the output of those tasks is counted in official calculations. Most often, unpaid care work is neither formally counted as economic output, nor is it compensated. Instead, it is seen as women’s responsibility, due to their gender. This ultimately means that the immense amount of time, effort and skill women (and girls) put into the economy is invisible.

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School children in Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Five ways to build resilience in Nigeria’s education system


By Adedeji Adeniran, Director of Research at the Centre for the Study of the Economies of Africa (CSEA) and Thelma Obiakor, PhD Candidate at the London School of Economics and Political Science


COVID-19 has compounded a long-standing learning crisis in many African countries, where millions of children were already out of school before the pandemic.

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Diverse group of women illustration

Trois pistes d’action concrètes pour combler les lacunes en matière de données sur le genre


Par Deirdre Appel, Community Manager, Clearinghouse, PARIS21 et Fatoumata Ngom, Analyste des politiques, OCDE, Direction de la coopération pour le développement


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Moins de la moitié des données nécessaires au suivi de l’ODD 5, « Parvenir à l’égalité des sexes et autonomiser toutes les femmes et les filles », sont disponibles. Les données sur le genre sont bien plus que des données ventilées par sexe. Selon la Division de la statistique des Nations Unies, elles comprennent des données concernant exclusivement ou principalement les femmes et les filles, couvrent un large éventail de questions et réalités socio-économiques, et donnent un aperçu significatif des différences existant en matière de bien-être entre les femmes et les hommes, les filles et les garçons. Lors de l’élaboration de politiques publiques, si l’on ne parvient pas à saisir et à mesurer les problèmes liés au genre à l’aide de données solides et actualisées, les plus vulnérables de la société resteront au bord du chemin. Avec des données sur le genre en quantité et qualité suffisantes, on peut élaborer des politiques plus équitables qui tiennent compte du facteur genre, contribuant ainsi à une prospérité économique durable pour tous.

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Why we need to build trust and guarantee civic space to deal with global challenges    


By Gabriela Keseberg Dávalos, Head of Communications, Southern Voice, and Rita da Costa, Senior Counsellor, OECD Development Centre


With an ongoing pandemic, war raging in Ukraine and the executive in Sri Lanka collapsing like a house of cards, people around the world may wonder: is my government prepared for multiple overlapping and future crises? What will happen to me if I cannot work and provide for my family?

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A man and woman are seen in silhouette after breaching a border fence

Shifting our approach on migration from security to development


By Xavier Savard-Fournier, International migration specialist & Reporter and analyst of international affairs


It is right under our eyes, yet it is still hard to see for some. Not everyone experiences the same warm, welcoming attitude when crossing borders to seek refuge. As scores of people flee the war in Ukraine, many people of colour experienced discrimination, violence and racism or were blocked at borders.  Based on the same security-led migration narratives, similar cases have occurred since the European migration crisis of 2015-2016.

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Jharkhand, India -Group of Indian school girls in class

Spiralling gender inequality is not inevitable: here’s how we can fix it


By Gabriela Bucher, Executive Director, Oxfam International


The more we listen to women’s rights leaders across the world, the harder it is to ignore the reality that we have been witnessing profound and staggering setbacks to gender equality.

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Anti-government protesters in Colombo, Sri Lanka, July 9, 2022

Sri Lankans are crying for food, fuel and a government they can trust: The world needs to listen


By Elizabeth Holbourne, Speechwriter, OECD Development Centre


When I introduce myself as half Sri Lankan, people’s eyes usually light up as they tell me about the wonderful holiday they had there with family and friends. In a country once seen as one of the most rapidly developing nations in South Asia, Sri Lanka’s economic crisis spiralling into a humanitarian crisis could very well be a bellwether of what is to come in many other parts of the world.

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Diverse group of women illustration

Three ways to close the gender data gap


By Deirdre Appel, Clearinghouse Community Manager, PARIS21 and Fatoumata Ngom, Policy Analyst, OECD, Development Co-operation Directorate


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Less than half the data needed to monitor SDG 5, “Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls”, is available. Gender data are about much more than sex-disaggregated data. According to the UN Statistics Division, they include data that affect women and girls exclusively or primarily, they span a wide range of socio-economic issues, and they provide meaningful insight into differences in wellbeing across women and men, and girls and boys. Failing to capture and measure gender issues with sound and timely data when designing policies, leaves the most vulnerable further behind. More and better gender data contribute to more equitable and gender-informed policy, all of which contribute to sustainable economic prosperity for all.

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