Fit for purpose means continuous change

by Susanna Moorehead, Chair, OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC)

dev-cooperation-puzzle-hand

As I arrived in Paris last week to take up office as Chair of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC), the 30 DAC Members gathered for a Senior Level Meeting. It was a great opportunity for me to meet people and understand the DAC’s role in helping to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

The DAC needs to be fit for its purpose of ending extreme poverty, which is increasingly concentrated in conflict-affected and fragile places. By 2030, 80% of poor people will be living in these conditions. In addition, 100 million more people will have fallen back into poverty if nothing is done to mitigate the effects of climate change and to make their livelihoods more resilient.  At the Senior Level Meeting,  Members endorsed the new DAC Recommendation on the Humanitarian-Development-Peace Nexus. This will drive coherence when working in conflict and fragile zones and demonstrate how the DAC is responding to changing development challenges.

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Multilateral action for sustainable development: How to build on the strength of ODA?

By Jorge Moreira da Silva, Director, Development Co-operation Directorate and Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, Chair, Development Assistance Committee

Multilateral wheelIn the backlash against globalisation and multilateralism and despite tightening national budgets, OECD countries’ combined Official Development Assistance (ODA) remains strong. While some criticise recently-released ODA figures for stagnating, steady commitment has been undeniable.

Indeed, ODA has remained politically resilient, steadily increasing since the turn of the century and doubling since 2000. In 2017, net ODA stood at USD 146.6 billion or 0.31% of gross national income (GNI). While this aggregate figure reflects a slight drop of 0.6% compared to 2016, previous figures were artificially high due to the refugee crisis that increased donor spending within their own borders. That spending subsided this year, and when in-country refugee costs are excluded, ODA increased by 1.1% from 2016 in real terms.

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